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Arthur Gary Bishop

Summary:

Arthur Gary Bishop went from being a honor student, Eagle Scout and teenage missionary to an obsessed pedophile and child killer that he later attributed to pornography that he was to exposed to while growing up.

Personal Information:

Born - 1951 Birthplace - Hinckley, UT Died - June 10, 1988 Location of Death - Utah State Prison Cause of Death - Execution - Lethal Injection General Information:

Gender - Male Religion - Mormon Ethnicity - White Education - Stevens-Henager College Occupation - Accounting Crime Chronology:

1978 - Excommunicated from the Mormon Church 1978 - Embezzlement 1984 - Murder 1984 - five counts - convicted 1984 - Kidnapping 1984 - five counts - convicted 1984 - Sexual Abuse 1984 - Sexual Abuse of a Minor Profile:

Gary Bishop molested children for many years without being caught. At some point his crimes advanced to murder, which he discovered also fed his sick needs. Bishop killed five young boys from 1979 until his capture in 1983. To try to control his impulses he would perform his abuse on puppies, but that failed.

After confessing to his crimes he was tried and sentenced to death. In preparation for his execution by lethal injection, he read the Book of Mormon repeatedly and shielded himself from the profanity spoken by the other inmates by wearing headphones.

In the final hours prior to his execution he fasted and prayed. Arthur Gary Bishiop was executed by lethal injection by the state of Utah on June 10, 1988. He was 37 years old.

Known Victims:

Alonzo Daniels Age four. Murdered after being kidnapped from his families apartment complex courtyard.

Kim Peterson Age 11.

Murdered after going to Bishop's home to sell him his roller skates.

Danny Davis Age four. Murdered after being kidnapped at a grocery store.

Troy Ward Age six. Murdered after being kidnapped on his birthday from a park near his home.

Graeme Cunningham Age 13. Murdered after he vanished from his neighborhood.

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Feminists have been attacking politicians or opponents with buckets of excrements without any or minimal judiciary consequences. Let's turn this game around and dowse feminists with buckets of excrements. Let's see what happens.

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Awake during surgery: 'I'm in hell'

CNN

May 17, 2010

(CNN) -- When Carol Weiher was having her right eye surgically removed in 1998, she woke up hearing disco music. The next thing she heard was "Cut deeper, pull harder."

She desperately wanted to scream or even move a finger to signal to doctors that she was awake, but the muscle relaxant she'd received prevented her from controlling her movements.

"I was doing a combination of praying and pleading and cursing and screaming, and trying anything I could do but I knew that there was nothing that was working," said Weiher, of Reston, Virginia. Weiher is one of few people who have experienced anesthesia awareness. Although normally a patient does not remember anything about surgery that involves general anesthesia, about one or two people in every 1,000 may wake up during general anesthesia, according to the Mayo Clinic. Most of these cases involve the person being aware of the surrounding environment, but some experience severe pain and go on to have psychological problems.

The surgical tools didn't cause Weiher pain -- only pressure -- but the injections of a paralytic drug during the operation "felt like ignited fuel," she said. "I thought, well, maybe I've been wrong about my life, and I'm in hell," she said. The entire surgery lasted five-and-a-half hours. Sometime during it she either passed out or fell unconscious under the anesthetic. When she awoke, she began to scream.

"All I could say to anyone was, 'I was awake! I was awake!' " she said.

The use of general anesthesia is normally safe and produces a state of sedation that doesn't break in the middle of a procedure, doctors say. The patient and anesthesiologist collect as much medical history as possible beforehand, including alcohol and drug habits, to help determine the most appropriate anesthetic.

You may think of it as "going to sleep," but in terms of what your body is doing, general anesthesia has very little in common with taking a nap.

During sleep, the brain is in its most active state; anesthesia, on the other hand, depresses central nervous system activity. On the operating table, your brain is less active and consumes less oxygen -- a state of unconsciousness nothing like normal sleep.

Doctors do not know exactly how general anesthesia produces this effect. It is clear that anesthetic drugs interfere with the transmission of chemicals in the brain across the membranes, or walls, of cells. But the mechanism is the subject of ongoing research, Dr. Alexander Hannenberg, anesthesiologist in Newton, Massachusetts, and president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

Patients who remember falling unconscious under the anesthesia generally have a pleasant experience of it, Hannenberg said, and the period of "waking up" is also a relaxed state, Hannenberg said. Anesthesia awareness may relate to human error or equipment failure in delivering the anesthetic, Hannenberg said.

There are patients for whom doctors err on the side of a lower dose because of the nature of their condition, Hannenberg said. Someone who is severely injured and has lost a lot of blood, a patient with compromised cardiac function, or a woman who needs an emergency Caesarean section would all be at risk for serious side effects of high doses of anesthetic.

Heart or lung problems, daily alcohol consumption, and long-term use of opiates and other drugs may put patients at higher risk for anesthesia awareness, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Weiher started a campaign called the Anesthesia Awareness Campaign that seeks to educate people about the perils of waking up during surgery. She has spoken with about 4,000 people worldwide who have also had anesthesia awareness experiences.

The American Society of Anesthesiologists is engaged in an Anesthesia Awareness Registry, a research project through the University of Washington to examine cases of the phenomenon. One of the goals of the Anesthesia Awareness Campaign is to make brain activity monitoring a standard of care.

There has been controversy about the use of brain function monitors in general anesthesia. Advocates such as Dr. Barry Friedberg, anesthesiologist and founder of the nonprofit Goldilocks Anesthesia Foundation, say brain monitoring is essential for ensuring the patient achieves the appropriate sedation so as to not wake up. The monitors use a scale of 0 to 100 to reflect what's going on in the brain: 0 is a total absence of brain activity, 98 to 100 is wide awake, and 45 to 60 is about where general anesthesia puts the patient, Friedberg said.

But a 2008 study in the New England Journal of Medicine found no benefit in using brain function monitoring to prevent anesthesia awareness. The American Society of Anesthesiology has said the monitoring is not routinely indicated for general anesthesia, but may have some value and be appropriate for specific patients. The downsides are that they are expensive, and should not be used in place of heart rate and breathing signals when regulating the anesthesia.

Research does not consistently demonstrate a benefit from using brain function monitors, and the decision to use them should be made on an individual basis, Hannenberg said.

The anesthesiologist carefully monitors the patient's breathing and blood pressure, which can rise and fall, while the person is under the anesthetic, Hannenberg said. The treatment is tailored to the patient -- a young, healthy athlete will tolerate fluctuations in blood pressure better than someone with a serious condition, Hannenberg said.

As with surgical procedures themselves, anesthesia can result in stroke, heart attack and death. Such complications are more likely in people who have serious medical problems, and elderly people. Over the last two decades, anesthesiologists have made significant strides in reducing those risks, Hannenberg said.

A 6-year-old boy in Richmond, Virginia, recently died after going into cardiac arrest during a routine dental procedure that involved general anesthesia, CNN affiliate WTVR reported. Weiher had to have subsequent surgeries, including an operation on her other eye and a hysterectomy, and the experiences were terrifying. She is still taking medication for post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of her anesthesia awareness experience.

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95 percent of the victims of violence are men. Because women are natural cowards who send men to handle things when they are dangerous.

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How do I make my vagina tighter naturally?

It’s embarrassing to ask, but this is a real issue for a lot of women.

Of course, sex isn’t everything in a relationship, but sexual satisfaction is certainly an important part of it!

So if you feel like you have a stretched vagina, or a loose vagina, this can be a serious source of stress. You feel pressure to perform, feel, and look, a certain way for your partner.

Vaginal looseness can seriously damage a woman’s confidence, and make her feel insecure about pleasing her partner, or herself for that matter.

After I had my first child, I didn’t feel sexy, confident or secure in my ability to perform sexually. In fact, to put it bluntly, I felt like I had a flappy vagina.

I wanted to find a solution for natural vagina tightening – -and was willing to try anything. I did my research, tried a ton of different products, herbs and exercises, and found out what worked and what didn’t.

So while it’s a little embarrassing, I’d like to share my experience with other women like me, who want to tighten their loose vagina and get that sexy back!

Now, contrary to popular belief, a stretched vagina does not come from too much intercourse. A loose vagina can be caused by various reasons, such as childbirth, menopause, or simply natural aging.

You may have heard of kegel exercises, other vagina tightening creams or treatments, and various exercise or diet programs that are designed to tighten a stretched vagina.

How do I tighten my vagina naturally?

Believe it or not, this is not an uncommon question – and vaginal looseness is more common than you think!

It’s nothing to be embarrassed about – although I know it’s a sensitive subject.

If you’ve found this page then you’re probably having some concern about vaginal looseness. Who knows? Maybe you’re even a man trying to help out your special friend who is worried about her vaginal looseness.

If you’ve felt embarrassed or uncomfortable because you feel like you have a wide vagina – I know you’re looking for something that really works, and works fast.

I’ve tried exercises, herbal treatments, and natural vaginal tightening creams. Here’s what worked for me, and what didn’t.

I’ve rated my preference for vaginal tightening from least effective to most effective. #3 – Herbal Treatments to tighten a stretched vagina

There are several herbs that can help tighten vaginal muscles.

— Pueraria Mirifica helps tighten your vaginal walls by encouraging genital tissue regeneration, This herb also balances estrogen levels to counteract your hormonal imbalances.

Bonus: this herb also helps protect against uterus cancer.

— Another natural vaginal tightening herb includes Curcuma Comosa. This herb helps tighten vaginal muscles, it also helps to correct future vaginal looseness by protecting against vaginal wall prolapse.

Curcuma Comosa also helps cure vaginal dryness, hot flashes and can alleviate menstrual cramps.

— You can also correct a stretched vagina by using natural douches that restore elasticity and strength.

These can be made through a combination of natural ingredients, such as:

• Boiled gooseberry • Vinegar and water • Diluted lime juice, alum powder and pickling spices

Personally, I tried several combinations of these natural herbs, and felt that they made me feel healthier and cleaner down in my lady-bits, but didn’t feel all that tighter.

I really liked the natural health benefits, but didn’t feel herbal remedies solved my problem of loose vaginal walls.

#2 – Kegel Exercises

A popular natural way to get a tight vagina is through Kegel exercises.

You perform these vagina tightening exercises by squeezing your inner pelvic muscles. Think about when you stop your self from peeing while you’re already urinating. These are the same muscles. Try it out next time you’re using the bathroom.

Once you have figured out how to do this, simply repeat this exercise multiple times throughout the day.

You can do this discreetly and at your leisure. No one has to know you are working to tighten a wide vagina. Remember this is just one of the natural ways correct vaginal looseness.

In my experience, if you do them over time consistently, kegel exercises really do work! You need to be consistent and keep at it (which is easy because they’re so discreet), and eventually you will strengthen your pelvic muscles and, in turn, your vaginal walls. This will make you tighter, naturally.

So, while I liked that the kegel exercises work over time, I was anxious to try something else that would help them work faster, and last longer. This is why these vaginal exercises are my #2 choice for natural vaginal tightening treatments that really work.

#1 – V-tight gel and tightening program

V tight gel is a tightening cream that claims to correct vaginal looseness by tightening skin and tightening the vaginal walls.

It’s advertised to work both by itself, or with accelerated results in correcting a stretched vagina if you use it together with the v-tight vaginal exercise program.

According to the manufacturer, v-tight works within a few minutes to make your vagina tighter after applying the cream. The product also says you can have intercourse with your partner after only a few minutes of applying the gel.

It’s a natural tightening cream that is made from Manjakani extract, and other natural ingredients, which has been used by women in Asian countries for centuries.

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Men are perpetrators of crime for two reasons only. 1. Because woman want money, even if they claim otherwise. 2. To show off some violent superiority over other men, in order to impress some women.

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Indian woman cuts off penis of Hindu holy man who allegedly tried to rape her

An Indian woman cut off the penis of a Hindu holy man who tried to rape her and who she accused of sexually assaulting her for the past eight years, police said.

The 24-year-old law student was at home in the Kerala state capital of Thiruvananthapuram when she was allegedly attacked by Gangeshananda Theerthapada, who claims to be a spiritual healer.

The 54-year-old was reported to be in a stable condition after reconstructive surgery.

Police officer G Sparjan Kumar said the woman fled her home after the attack on Friday night and called police.

When he again visited her home on Friday night and tried to force himself on her, she got hold of a knife and attacked him, Mr Kumar said.

The New Delhi Television news channel said the woman's family knew Theerthapada, who used to visit their home to cure her bed-ridden father.

She told police he would rape her whenever he had an opportunity.

Pinarayi Vijayan, the state's chief minister, told reporters it was brave of the woman to take such action.

"It's a courageous and strong act by the woman," he said.

Violent crimes against women have been on the rise in India despite tough laws enacted by the government.

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Channeling tens of millions of refugees to Europe can kill feminism and Europe. It can do so reliably in the span of two decades. And to aide it is low risk political activism for people with a lot of money. Suited for Qatari and Russian billionaires. Just finance humanitarian efforts, such as rescue vessels on the Mediterranean, or life vests for those who board in Libya.

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Lingerie model gets 'designer vagina' after REFUSING doctor's advice to grow her bikini line out

A lingerie model has gone under the knife to get a "designer vagina" to resolve a painful problem with her genitals.

Tracy Kiss, 29, endured pain every single day, whether she was walking along the street, working out or even sitting down.

The single mother-of-two was left fearing she had "deformed" genitals, but a doctor told her the problem was down to excess skin and recommended growing her pubic hair out.

Tracy, who opened up about the problem on 5STAR's Don't Tell The Doctor, chose to undergo surgery instead as she feared the look would not go down well in the modelling world.

Seeking the advice of Doctor Belinda Fenty on the new show, the Buckinghamshire native revealed how she feared her vagina was "deformed".

Speaking to the doctor, who works in gynaecology and antenatal medicine, at her home, Tracy explained how the intimate issue affected her - saying she often had to awkwardly adjust herself in public to try and alleviate the pain.

After attempting to self-diagnose using the web, the model admitted that she had been left scared after viewing a string of responses, choosing instead to seek a definitive answer.

"I’ve only seen [my vagina] when I took a photo to see where the pain was coming from, I was so surprised really in the difference in size and shape and it looks like it’s deformed," she told the programme.

"I think I have excess skin, but I don’t know what to compare it to see how much."

But Doctor Fenty put her fears to rest as she explained the cause of the pain following an examination.

The medical professional told Tracy: "It does not look deformed. The left side looks bigger than the right side, but that is absolutely within the normal range but that’s probably what’s giving you your problem.

"I can see that your inner lips are hanging lower than your outer lips, that is definitely what it going to be causing your problems."

Reassuring the model that she wasn't suffering from any abnormalities, the doctor suggested that Tracy grow out her bikini line to provide a bit of cushioning.

"'I do lingerie modelling and I don’t know how well that would go down," explained Tracy.

"I already think I have quite a big bulge in the skin and think if I have a big bush of hair it would look quite obvious in lingerie."

Choosing instead to take a more drastic approach to solving her issue, she opted to undergo a labiaplasty.

The procedure, also known as vulval surgery, involves the removal of excess skin from the vagina lips.

Heading to eminent cosmetic and reconstructive surgeon Angelica Kavouni's Harley street clinic, Tracy went under the knife.

Staying awake for the procedure, Tracy had a local anaesthetic, while the surgeon seared off the small piece of flesh that had been negatively affecting her.

Despite the painful post-op recovery period, the hopeful model said: "I will get my life back and it's more than worth it."

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Men risk their lives in wars so women can enjoy societies where they can pursue feminist goals, such as punishing men for sexist language.

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Are we ready for the first human head transplant?

In a 1978 essay titled "Where Am I?" the philosopher Daniel Dennett suggested that the brain was the only organ of which it’s better to be a transplant donor than recipient.

Now Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero wants to turn philosophical thought experiments into reality by transplanting the head of Valery Spiridonov, who suffers from a debilitating muscle wasting disease, onto the healthy body of a dead donor.

Beside posing questions about personal identity, there are more prosaic challenges that must first be overcome. The brain would have to be kept alive during surgery by cooling it to 10-15°C, and the immune system would need to be powerfully suppressed to prevent transplant rejection.

But the greatest hurdle may be how to restore connections to the spinal cord. Without this connection the brain would have no control of its new body.

In 1970, Robert White at Case Western Reserve University performed a head transplant using monkeys. Without spinal connections the animal was paralyzed from the neck down for the brief time it could be kept alive.

Canavero believes the time is right to revisit this controversial procedure, due to recent advances in surgical techniques and scientific understanding. He hopes that his “GEMINI” protocol—combining polyethylene glycol to fuse nerves with electrical stimulation of spinal circuits—will allow his patient to move and even walk following the procedure.

Breakthrough or spin?

Canavero has been criticized for publicizing his ideas in the media before releasing peer-reviewed research papers. Only time will tell whether promised experimental results are forthcoming. But, on the basis of current neuroscientific understanding, does the proposal stack up?

Unlike many tissues in our body, the nerves of the spinal cord don’t spontaneously repair themselves after damage. And despite regular media reports hailing new breakthroughs, currently there is no effective cure for the millions of people paralyzed by spinal cord injuries each year.

Polyethylene glycol is among a growing list of treatments (including drugs, stem cells and gene therapies) showing promise in pre-clinical studies, but the path to real-world applications is notoriously tricky.

Experiments in animals such as rats and mice are essential to developing new therapies, but important differences must be borne in mind when extrapolating to human treatment. Given sufficient retraining, rodents—even with completely severed spinal cords—can learn to walk again, because much of their circuitry for locomotion is located below the injury.

In contrast, the brains of primates such as monkeys and humans are more directly involved in guiding movements. As a result, the recovery experienced by people with complete spinal injuries is much more limited.

For those who live with spinal cord injuries, there are some reasons for cautious optimism. A U.S. trial of epidural stimulation is reporting impressive results using a small pacemaker-like device to send electrical signals into the spinal cord. Participants in the trial have been able to move their legs and even support their own weight while standing.

The mechanisms underlying these improvements are not well understood, but stimulation seems to reawaken the spinal cord and may allow it to respond to residual connections from the brain that have survived injury. More speculatively, it may in future be possible to control stimulation directly from electrical signals recorded from the brain using brain-computer interface technology.

Although epidural stimulation is a promising line of research, it is being trialed in a select group of patients and is still far from a magic cure. So, if we can’t yet mend an injured spinal cord, what hope do we have for joining the brain to an entirely new body?

The capacity for rewiring is not limitless

While most spinal injuries are caused by traumas that bruise or tear the nerves, a transplant surgeon could sever the cord cleanly with a scalpel blade. But weighed against this small advantage is the staggering complexity of joining two separate neural circuits that have neither developed nor functioned together before.

Even if the spinal cord could be reconnected, would the patient ever learn to control the new body? The brain has a remarkable capacity for rewiring itself, especially as we develop during childhood. But the “plasticity” of the adult brain has limitations.

Many amputees experience vivid and often agonizingly painful “phantom” sensations from where a lost limb used to be, even years after amputation. This suggests that our mental representation of ourselves—our body schema—may not easily adjust to changes in our own bodies, let alone get used to someone else’s entirely.

Perhaps transplant tests with monkeys may in future provide convincing support for applying this surgery in patients, although such experiments would certainly not be allowed by the strict regulations that govern animal research in the U.K. Nor should they be at present, given the severity of the procedure and slim chance of success.

The media love stories about maverick scientists fighting the establishment. But science most often progresses in careful, incremental steps that are published and scrutiniZed in peer-reviewed journals. The philosophers can speculate whether it is better to be the donor or recipient of a brain transplant.

But as a neuroscientist, until we have the technology to reconnect the spinal cord, neither is an appealing prospect in reality.

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Why is sex so important? Because life is so full of shit, that without sex, it's just not worth living.

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Assessing Libya's Chemical Weapons Threat

Jihadist groups have long fixated on chemical and biological weapons, from al Qaeda's pre-9/11 programs, in places such as the Deronta training camp in Afghanistan, to its 2003 plot to deploy improvised cyanide weapons on subways. Now there are growing fears that Islamic State militants in Libya have access to such weapons and could use them in battle or in terrorist attacks in the West. However, these fears are overblown. Chemical weapons have been an ineffective tool for terrorists in the past, and the challenges of transporting large quantities of chemical materials — though surmountable — nearly always outweigh the benefits for terrorist groups.

Recent concern over Libya's chemical weapons stems from the Islamic State's capture of several sites where former Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi reportedly produced and stockpiled chemical agents. Specifically, observers fear that militants will find and use sarin, a clear, unassuming liquid that when vaporized acts as a nerve agent that can cause paralysis and respiratory failure. When inserted into rocket warheads and artillery shells and properly employed, the chemical agent could help the Islamic State decimate opponents in its battle for control over the region.

But while the group has used some chemical weapons in Iraq and Syria, where it manufactures small amounts of low-quality chlorine gas and mustard agent, there is no indication at all that it has access to sarin. Nor has there been any sign that the Islamic State is trying to export chemical weapons out of Syria and Iraq — perhaps in part because it has had such mixed success with chemical weapons closer to home. In 2007, Islamic State predecessor al Qaeda in Iraq deployed several large truck bombs laced with chlorine, but the attack inflicted few casualties. The Islamic State's own chemical attacks against rebel opponents have been only marginally successful and have not produced the mass casualties the group hoped for.

In Libya, No Sign of Chemical Weapons

Unlike their counterparts in Iraq and Syria, Islamic State militants in Libya have not used any chemical weapons so far. They did manage to take over numerous sites where Gadhafi's government allegedly stored sarin, but the facilities may well have been empty or destroyed before their arrival. During the multilateral intervention in Libya, the United States and its allies heavily targeted sites associated with the country's chemical weapons program. And what Western powers could not bomb, they may have bought. After the revolution, U.S. and other foreign intelligence services purchased weapons in the country to keep them out of regional arms markets. Regardless, even in the midst of incredibly brutal battles against the government and other jihadist groups, the Islamic State has not used any lingering remnants of the Gadhafi administration's chemical weapons program.

If some of the former government's sarin stockpiles did survive, they would likely be useless by now. Sarin degrades quickly, and countries often wait to produce it until just before an attack. In fact, U.S. chemical warheads had separate chambers to keep the chemicals apart until deployment. Any sarin mixed before Gadhafi's fall has long since expired, and after being stored in half-ruined facilities for five years, any precursor chemicals — and the equipment needed to mix them — may be just as useless.

If the Islamic State in Libya did have access to sarin or other chemical agents, we believe it would use them on the battlefield in Libya before attempting to export them abroad as its counterparts in Iraq and Syria have done.

Little Potential for Attacks in the West

If the Islamic State could transport enough chemical agent into Western countries for an attack, the group would no doubt use it. However, a mass-casualty chemical weapons attack would require a large amount of nerve agent. Beyond the difficulties the Islamic State would face transporting it, once in the target country militants would have trouble formulating an effective plan for using it. In Iraq, al Qaeda used some old chemical artillery rounds filled with sarin in improvised explosive devices; more recently in Iraq and Syria, the group used mortar rounds filled with mustard agent and chlorine. But an attack in a Western country would require a new and unfamiliar method.

In fact, no sarin attack in the West would be worth the effort: While a small quantity of an agent such as sarin can theoretically kill many people, using it to cause mass casualties is a challenge. There is a reason military attack plans involving chemical weapons include extensive barrages of artillery or rocket artillery carrying large quantities of agents such as sarin to generate a thick, choking cloud. Small releases of chemical agents are far less effective, and it is difficult to administer a lethal dose of something like sarin, which is a very volatile substance that dissipates quickly.

The Islamic State would not be the first terrorist group to find the use of chemical weapons a daunting and ineffective way to wreak havoc on civilian populations. In the 1980s, Aum Shinrikyo, a Japanese terrorist group, used sarin in multiple attacks and poured millions of dollars into biological and later chemical weapons production programs, with few results. In addition to sarin, the group used hydrogen cyanide gas, anthrax and botulinum toxin in its largely failed attempts to orchestrate dramatic mass casualty attacks. For example, in Aum Shinrikyo's 1995 strikes against the Tokyo subway system, group members on five different subway trains punctured 11 plastic bags filled with sarin, yet killed only 12 people.

It is far easier, cheaper and more deadly to plan and execute attacks using explosives or firearms than it is to attempt to smuggle chemical agents into a Western country. This has been proved time and again by chemical weapons terrorist attacks such as those conducted by Aum Shinrikyo and al Qaeda in Iraq. All are relative failures compared with bombing operations, such as the Madrid or London train attacks in 2004 and 2005, and with armed assaults such as the November Paris attack. In the end, the real-world simplicity and effectiveness of simple bombs and jihadist armed assaults will prevail over the attraction of chemical weapons.

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Second-generation male Muslim immigrants have all reason to hate Europe. They can't get any girls here. Whatever they do. So it is an understandable reaction that they want to blow themselves up, and take a few along.

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